Racial Discrimination

An employer may not terminate an employee or take other adverse job action because of race or color. This is also true of a prospective employee.  Work rules must be applied uniformly to all employees, regardless of color or race. Policies that have a disproportionately adverse impact on minorities are strictly prohibited.  Many times this type of activity can only be discovered during litigation.  Learn whether your employer has violated Title VII or other laws including the Illinois Human Rights Act (Act).  A litigation attorney who concentrates on employment issues can help you decide which laws are being broken and which venue to file your complaint in.  The good news is that most companies go out of their way to file jobs with minorities.  This means if you are a good worker the chances of you having any work related issues is very small.   However when an employee runs into a workplace that is unique and discriminatory, action is sometimes required.  This is where I can help.

Companies generally are not stupid enough to tell you that race played a role in not getting the promotion or in getting hired.  Many times, racial discrimination cases are proven through circumstantial evidence.  These cases are tough and require dedication and attention to detail.  I see more cases where people aren't promoted because they believe race is playing a role.  However, you should be aware that it is not enough to just say I applied for a promotion, didn't get it and I am Black so therefore I believe I am the victim of racial discrimination.   There needs to be some facts which prove the allegation.  For example if ten people apply for the job, only one is going to get it so the other nine can't just claim discrimination.  In that example you would have to show why you didn't get the job based on race alone.  After all, the other eight people who applied for the job didn't get the job either.  If they are a different race than you, that could show that race did not play a role.  Remember the burden is on your to prove your allegations, not just make them.  In that type of circumstance, you would need to show that no reasonable person would have not hired your and that the only way you could not have been hired was because of discrimination.

In Illinois under the Act, race is defined  White, Black and Asian.  Those are the only three races that are recognized under the Act.  So that means people who consider themselves Hispanic can't file a complaint with the Illinois Department of Human Rights ("IDHR") under racial discrimination, they have to file under Ancestry, color or citizenship.  These types of nuances are important and one reason why you should call my office for a free consultation. I won't charge you to talk about your issue.  I also won't take your case if I don't think you have a good chance of success.   And I don't charge hourly in most cases because I realize most people who just lost their job don't have the money to pay an attorney.  Therefore I like to work on a contingency fee basis.  Either we both get paid or neither one of use gets paid.  I believe this is the fairest way and it also lets you know I believe in your case.  If I don't believe in your case, I wouldn't take it without getting paid.

E-mail your question about RACIAL DISCRIMINATION or visit my blog.

You may call 24/7:
Peter LaSorsa, Attorney at Law
Representing Victims of Racial Discrimination in Illinois
Phone: 312-505-5038 or 312-505-5038


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